Posts Tagged ‘Chicago Cubs’

What If the Dodgers Had Stayed in Brooklyn?

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

What if the Dodgers had stayed in Brooklyn?  Further, what if migration in the modern era had never taken place, thereby forcing expansion in Kansas City, San Francisco, and other MLB cities.

My paradigm assumes the following:

  • Tampa, Toronto, Arizona, and Montreal do not have teams
  • A’s, Braves, Browns, Dodgers, and Senators stay in their original locations
  • The Giants move to Minneapolis after the 1957 season.
  • Team names reflect the location’s history and lore
    • Grizzly Bears:  California’s state animal
    • Conquistadors:  Group claiming Oakland for Spain’s king in the 1770s
    • Loggers:  Washington state’s rich logging history
    • Gold:  Northern California’s gold rush in the mid-19th century
    • Mountaineers:  Georgia’s magnificent mountains
    • Astronauts:  Houston’s fame as the home of NASA
    • Express:  Colorado’s key role in America’s railroad history

Expansion teams have their inaugural years in parentheses.

1961-1965

American League

Boston Red Sox
Chicago White Sox
Cleveland Indians
Detroit Tigers
Los Angeles Angels (1961)
New York Yankees
Philadelphia Athletics
St. Louis Browns
San Francisco Gold (1961)
Washington Senators

National League

Boston Braves
Brooklyn Dodgers
Chicago Cubs
Cincinnati Reds
Los Angeles Grizzly Bears (1961)
Milwaukee Brewers (1961)
Minnesota Giants
Philadelphia Phillies
Pittsburgh Pirates
St. Louis Cardinals

1966-1975

American League East

Baltimore Orioles (1966)
Boston Red Sox
Cleveland Indians
Georgia Mountaineers (1966)
New York Yankees
Philadelphia Athletics
Washington Senators

American League West

Chicago White Sox
Detroit Tigers
Kansas City Royals (1966)
Los Angeles Angels (1961)
San Francisco Gold (1961)
St. Louis Browns
Texas Rangers (1966)

National League East

Boston Braves
Brooklyn Dodgers
Cincinnati Reds
Denver Express (1966)
Houston Astronauts (1966)
Philadelphia Phillies
Pittsburgh Pirates

National League West

Chicago Cubs
Los Angeles Grizzly Bears (1961)
Milwaukee Brewers (1961)
Minnesota Giants
St. Louis Cardinals
San Diego Padres (1966)
Seattle Loggers (1966)

1976-Present

American League East

Baltimore Orioles (1966)
Boston Red Sox
New York Yankees
Philadelphia Athletics
Washington Senators

American League Central

Chicago White Sox
Cleveland Indians
Detroit Tigers
Georgia Mountaineers (1966)
St. Louis Browns

American League West

Kansas City Royals (1966)
Los Angeles Angels (1961)
Oakland Conquistadors (1976)
San Francisco Gold (1961)
Texas Rangers (1976)

National League East

Boston Braves
Brooklyn Dodgers
Miami Marlins (1976)
Philadelphia Phillies
Pittsburgh Pirates

National League Central

Chicago Cubs
Cincinnati Reds
Houston Astronauts (1966)
Milwaukee Brewers (1961)
St. Louis Cardinals

National League West

Denver Express (1966)
Los Angeles Grizzly Bears (1961)
Minnesota Giants
San Diego Padres (1966)
Seattle Loggers (1966)

A version of this article appeared on www.thesportspost.com on November 14, 2016.

Hank Aaron’s Last Home Run

Monday, April 10th, 2017

As America recovered from its Bicentennial hangover, Hank Aaron clubbed a home run in the Brewers-Angels game on July 20, 1976.  It was not, in any way, a cause for ceremony.  It was, however, highly significant.

Aaron’s solo smash off the Angels’ Dick Drago was his last home run, though nobody knew it at the time.  Hammerin’ Hank followed George Scott’s solo home run, one of 18 blasts that Scott swatted in 1976.  Jerry Augustine got the win for the Brewers—his first in more than a month—scattering five Angel hits in seven innings.  It capped a streak of five consecutive losses for Augustine, who had a 9-12 record, 3.30 Earned Run Average, and WHIP of 1.299.

Aaron, Scott, et al. belted 12 hits against the Angels; Von Joshua, Tim Johnson, Darrell Porter, and Robin Yount scored the other Brewer runs.  Johnson, the Brewer second baseman, had an outstanding 3-for-3 day.  In the eighth inning, relief pitcher Danny Frisella replaced Augustine.

When Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s career home run record on April 8, 1974 by hitting his 715th home run, every dinger afterward became, simply, icing on top of frosting.  His round-tripper in the Brewers’ 6-2 victory over the boys from Anaheim was his 755th home run; Aaron hit 10 home runs, batted .229, and racked up 62 hits in a rather uneventful 1976 season for the Brewers—a 66-96 record garnered 6th place in the American League East.

At age 42, Aaron retired after the 1976 season with outstanding career statistics:

  • 3,771 hits
  • 2,174 runs scored
  • 13,941 plate appearances
  • .305 batting average
  • 2,287 RBI (major league record)
  • Led the major leagues in RBI four times

Henry Louis Aaron clocked his first major league home run on April 23, 1954.  Throughout the next two decades and change, Aaron faced the pitching gods of Major League Baseball—Don Sutton, Tom Seaver, Bob Gibson, Juan Marichal, Steve Carlton, Fergie Jenkins, Don Gullett, Roy Face, Don Drysdale, Nolan Ryan, Vida Blue, Sandy Koufax, Robin Roberts.  When he went yard, it was the definition of power against power.  Tom Seaver’s page on the Baseball Hall of Fame web site recalls Aaron’s statement of Seaver being “the toughest pitcher I’ve ever faced.”

Aaron’s last home run occurred during the year that the Yankees reached the World Series for the first time since 1964; Chicago Cubs outfielder Rick Monday snatched an American flag from two trespassers about to burn it in the Dodger Stadium outfield; the Chicago White Sox played in shorts for one game; Ted Turner became the sole owner of the Atlanta Braves; the second incarnation of Yankee Stadium débuted after two years of renovations; Philadelphia Phillies third baseball Mike Schmidt knocked four home runs in a game against the Cubs; original Houston Astros owner Judge Roy Hofheinz sold the team that began its life as the Colt .45s; Dodgers manager Walter Alston resigned after 23 years at the helm in Ebbets Field and Chavez Ravine; and the Seattle Mariners and the Toronto Blue Jays began selecting players for the following year’s American League expansion.

A version of this article appeared on www.thesportspost.com on July 20, 2016.

1986, Hollywood, and the Chicago Cubs

Sunday, April 2nd, 2017

1986 was the Year of the Cub—for Hollywood, anyway.

About Last Night stars Rob Lowe and Demi Moore, charter members of the Brat Pack—a group of young actors dominating movie screens in the 1980s.  Lowe and Moore play a couple trying to extend a one-night stand into a relationship.  A montage of dates includes watching a Chicago Cubs game from a rooftop on Sheffield Avenue overlooking Wrigley Field.  Based on David Mamet’s mid-1970s play Sexual Perversity in Chicago, the film showcases several Windy City locations in addition to The Friendly Confines, including Grant Park, the Wells Street Bridge, and the Biograph Theater.

Chicago Tribune film critic Gene Siskel wrote, “As a backdrop for the human interaction, ‘About Last Night…’ manages to capture the spirit and look of Chicago as well as any film shot here since ‘Risky Business.’  And that’s true even though about half of the movie was shot in California.”

Running Scared stars Billy Crystal and Gregory Hines as Chicago Police Department detectives.  Their pairing was inspired.  Their chemistry, palpable.  Los Angeles Times film critic Sheila Benson wrote, “There’s really fine texture at the opening of ‘Running Scared’ (MPAA-rated R)—a great sleazy character named Snake (Joe Pantoliano), the partners’ silken assurance in and around their neighborhoods, and any number of good solid gags, accomplished with the utmost throwaway nonchalance.  After all the spurious ‘chemistry’ between acting pairs that’s oozed across the screen, Crystal and Hines give us friendship so tangible you can warm your hands in it.”

Crystal, a noted Yankee fan since birth, proudly wears Cubs and Blackhawks jerseys as Detective Danny Costanzo.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off showcases the adventures of the title character—a smooth-talking high school student—as he skips a day of school.  Bueller jaunts around Chicago with his best friend (Cameron) and his girlfriend (Sloane).  They make many stops around the city, including the Sears Building, the Chicago Board of Trade, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

New York Times film critic Nina Darnton described Bueller’s skill in deftly crossing every boundary that separates cliques in high school.  “The jocks, druggies, heavy-metal types, preppies, losers, grinds and popular kids all think he’s swell,” wrote Darnton.  “Why?  Because he has that magic ability so prized in adolescence—he can get away with anything.”

Of course, no trip on a day off in Chicago would be complete without a voyage to Wrigley Field, where Ferris catches a foul ball during a Cubs game.  It’s only natural that this event occurs for the carefree teenager who floats through life.

These films comprised a slice of culture during a year when Geraldo Rivera hosted a television special about opening Al Capone’s vaults, Microsoft held an Initial Public Offering for stock purchases, America celebrated the Statue of Liberty’s centennial, Oprah Winfrey launched her syndicated television show, NBC revamped its peacock logo, and the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded.

The Cubs finished 1986 with a 70-90 record.  Second baseman Ryne Sandberg notched 178 hits, finishing 6th in the National League.

A version of this article appeared on www.thesportspost.com on June 11, 2016.

Radio, Baseball, and the Gipper

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Before he treated a chimpanzee named Bonzo like a child, pleaded the Notre Dame football team to win just one for the Gipper, and told Mr. Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall, Ronald Reagan was a baseball announcer.

Reagan called baseball games for WOC in Davenport, Iowa.  Started by Robert Karlowa as an experimental station in 1907, WOC later fell under the aegis of Bartlett Joshua Palmer, a chiropractor following in his father’s pioneering footsteps in chiropractic healing.  The University of Iowa’s Biographical Diction of Iowa web site details B.J. Palmer’s radio endeavors:  “In 1922, he obtained a license to operate station WOC in Davenport— the call letters stood for “World of Chiropractic”— purportedly the second radio station licensed to broadcast in the United States.  That venture expanded in 1929 to include WHO in Des Moines, and was incorporated as the Central Broadcasting Company, an NBC affiliate.

“The first WOC broadcasts were made from the living room of the Palmer home at 828 Brady Street in Davenport.  Broadcasts included lectures, musical programs, and many other programs.  The main purpose of the radio station was to advertise the chiropractic school and clinic, and B.J. was remarkably successful at that.”

Reagan’s audition for WOC took place in 1932.  “He had to stand in front of a microphone in a studio and make up a game,” explained William Gildea in his 2004 article “Former President Had A Passion for Sports” in the Washington Post.  With extraordinary detail and excitement in his voice, he recounted much of the fourth quarter of a game in which he played for Eureka— only in his fictitious version, Eureka won a game it actually lost.”

Reagan became the voice of sports for WHO before he launched his movie career in Hollywood in 1937.  Announcing the Chicago Cubs games allowed Reagan to develop his oratorical gifts, which served him well as an actor and a politician.  Sometimes he broadcast games on site.  Gildea stated, “More often, though, he was tucked away in the studio, recreating the games, using his imagination to flesh out the minimal description of the action available to him from the dots and dashes sent from the ballpark by a telegraph operator to the telegraph operator sitting across from him.

The future president’s involvement with the National Pastime continued in Hollywood.  In the 1952 movie The Winning Team, Reagan portrayed baseball icon Grover Cleveland Alexander.  Co-starring Doris Day as Alexander’s wife Aimee, The Winning Team ends on the climactic note of Alexander’s performance in the 1926 World Series featuring the St. Louis Cardinals and the New York Yankees.  It went seven games.  In the 7th inning of Game Seven, Alexander struck out Yankee powerhouse Tony Lazzeri to end the last viable Yankee threat.  Alexander kept the 8th and 9th innings scoreless, giving the Cardinals a 3-2 victory and the championship.  In a career spanning 1911 to 1930, Alexander compiled a 373-208 record, including four consecutive seasons of 30 or more wins.

The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library web site cites a 1983 quote capturing Reagan’s passion for baseball:  “I really do love baseball and I wish we could do this out on the lawn every day.  I wouldn’t even complain if a stray ball came through the Oval Office window now and then.”

A version of this article appeared on www.thesportspost.com on November 15, 2014.

The Hall of Fame Case for Bill Buckner

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

“Little roller up along first.  Behind the bag!  It gets through Buckner!  Here comes Knight and the Mets win it!”

Vin Scully’s broadcast of Mookie Wilson’s 10th inning ground ball in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series sends chills through the hearts of Red Sox Nation.  Buckner, a journeyman baseball player, gained immortality because Wilson’s grounder went through his legs.  In the hearts and minds of baseball fans, Buckner’s error lost the World Series for the Red Sox.

Never mind that Buckner might not have beat Wilson to the bag even if he fielded the ball.

Never mind that the Red Sox committed tactical mistakes leading up to Wilson’s at bat.

Never mind that the Mets victory in Game 6 tied the World Series at three games apiece—the Red Sox had a chance to win the series with a victory in Game 7.  Alas, they did not.

But one error, despite its fame, does not define a career.  Buckner may even be worthy of induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Outrageous?  Statistics say otherwise.

Using a four-point paradigm of hits, doubles, RBI, and batting average, Buckner’s numbers compare nicely to some other Hall of Famers.  The four points are based on:

  • hitting ability (number of hits)
  • hitting power (number of doubles)
  • clutch hitting (RBI)
  • consistency (batting average)

Bill Buckner played 2517 games between 1969 and 1990 for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, California Angels, and Kansas City Royals.  A first baseman and left fielder, Buckner racked up 2715 hits, 498 doubles, 1208 RBI, and a .289 batting average.

Bill Mazeroski, second baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates, played 2163 games from 1956 to 1972.  His career numbers:  2016 hits, 294 doubles, 853 RBI, and a .260 batting average.

Phil Rizzuto, shortstop for the New York Yankees, played 1661 games from 1941 to 1956.  His career numbers:  1588 hits, 239 doubles, 563 RBI, and a .273 batting average.

Johnny Evers of Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance double play fame played for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, and Chicago White Sox from 1902 to 1917 with one-game stints in 1922 and 1929.  His career numbers:  1659 hits, 216 doubles, 538 RBI, and a .270 batting average.

Yogi Berra played catcher for the New York Yankees from 1946 to 1963 and returned to the major leagues in 1965 with the New York Mets.  He played four games in the ’65 season and 2120 games in his major league tenure.  His career numbers:  2150 hits, 321 doubles, 1430 RBI, and a .285 batting average.

To be fair, offensive output in the traditional categories is not the only benchmark for Cooperstown.

Mazeroski earned eight Gold Gloves for his defensive prowess.

Rizzuto was a master of the bunt, often used sacrificially to advance runners.

Evers made his name on defense in the most hallowed of double play combinations.

Berra won the American League Most Valuable Player Award three times, played on the American League All-Star team 15 times, and exemplified the importance of defense in the catcher position.

Still, Buckner’s performance during a career lasting more than 20 years deserves further scrutiny by the baseball writers making the ultimate call on the worthiness of a player getting inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Based on statistics, Buckner’s entry is viable.

Statistics, after all, are stubborn things.

A version of this article appeared on www.thesportspost.com on May 31, 2013.

The Peacock Becomes a Phoenix

Sunday, May 17th, 2015

RemingtonIn the 1980s, NBC’s peacock rose like a phoenix after startling programming disasters, including Pink Lady and JeffSupertrain, and the departure of the original Not Ready for Prime Time cast of Saturday Night Live.  Under programming guru Brandon Tartikoff and his lieutenants, Warren Littlefield and Jeff Sagansky, NBC achieved prominence, success, and distinction.

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Bad Bill Dahlen

Monday, August 5th, 2013

Bill Dahlen earned his nickname “Bad Bill” because of his arguing style that had the finesse of a 300-pound ballerina.  It triggered 65 ejections for Dahlen, a figure in the Top 10 in baseball history.

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